Type 2 diabetes patient looking at pen

So you're ready to begin

First off, kudos to you on the decision to begin long-acting insulin. Since everyone learns a little differently, we have a few different ways to explain how to take BASAGLAR and help fit it into your life.

How to use BASAGLAR®

(insulin glargine injection) 100 units/mL

The first thing you need to know about injecting is to always refer to the full Instructions for Use before you start using BASAGLAR and each time you get another BASAGLAR KwikPen®. So, no slacking. To help with injecting, we have a few things designed just for you, like our Beginning BASAGLAR instruction video. You can also learn about all the features of our Beginning BASAGLAR app and download it today.

Beginning BASAGLAR® (insulin glargine injection) 100 units/mL instruction video

If you’re a visual learner, this video is for you. Follow along with your own Pen as Barry breaks down exactly how to take BASAGLAR.

Instructions for Use

Read the Instructions for Use before you start using BASAGLAR and each time you get another BASAGLAR KwikPen®. There may be new information.
Download instructions

Beginning BASAGLAR® (insulin glargine injection) 100 units/mL app

Beginning BASAGLAR App

Our mobile app gives you information you need to learn to inject—the Injection Instruction Video, Interactive Injection Guide, and more.

DOWNLOAD FOR iPHONE®/iPAD®:
  • Open the App Store, tap “Search”
  • Type “Beginning BASAGLAR,” select it, and tap “GET”
DOWNLOAD FOR ANDROID™ DEVICES:
  • Open the Google Play Store and type “Beginning BASAGLAR” in the search bar
  • Select it and tap “INSTALL”

Beginning a routine

Now it's time to turn your daily insulin injections into an everyday routine. BASAGLAR must be injected the same time every day. We've got some tips to get you going.

BASAGLAR Daily Routine
PAIR IT UP

Connect your injection to another part of your daily routine like brushing your teeth before bed.

Reward Yourself
REWARD YOURSELF

Pick something you enjoy, like a favorite show or game, to reward yourself after each injection.

Take BASAGLAR Same Time Each Day
ON THE CLOCK

Take it once a day, at the same time every day.

Set Reminder for Taking Insulin
REMINDERS

Set an alarm, write yourself notes, or ask a friend or family member to remind you to inject at the same time each day.

Stay Organized with Insulin Pen
STAY ORGANIZED

Keep all your supplies together and where you can see them. They should be easy to get to but out of the reach of children. And make sure you always have an extra insulin Pen in the fridge.

Storage tips

Staying organized is key to beginning and keeping a good routine. Below are a few tips to help make storage a breeze.

  • Stay sharp. Put all of your used needles in a sharps container, not the trash.
  • Shut the fridge. When you get your prescription, store unused Pens in your fridge at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). If your iceberg lettuce is beginning to look like an iceberg, your fridge is probably too cold. Don't freeze your Pen or use it if it's been frozen. Once you begin injecting with a Pen, store it at room temperature up to 86°F (30°C) and throw it away after 28 days.
  • Stock up. Always be prepared. Keep plenty of needles, test strips, lancets, and alcohol swabs handy for injections and emergencies.

Transitioning from Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) to BASAGLAR® (insulin glargine injection) 100 units/mL

If you’re familiar with Lantus, here are some things you should know about BASAGLAR:

15/15 Rule

In a clinical study,* BASAGLAR lowered blood sugar (A1C) as well as Lantus (approved in the US and outside the US).

*24-week study.

Changing from Lantus to BASAGLAR

Your dose should be the same when changing from Lantus to BASAGLAR. Always check with your healthcare provider to confirm your dose.

Inject BASAGLAR Once a Day

BASAGLAR is taken once a day at the same time each day, whenever is most convenient for you.

24 Hours Insulin

BASAGLAR works over 24 hours to lower your blood sugar.


Learn how to use the BASAGLAR KwikPen®

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with BASAGLAR. Your treatment with TZDs and BASAGLAR may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet
  • Sudden weight gain

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Visit fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Blood sugar expectations

Blood Sugar Changes
CHANGES ARE NORMAL

It's normal for your blood sugar to change over time, so your dose of BASAGLAR may change over time, too. Your doctor will start you on a dose that's right for you and adjust it as needed. Make sure to ask your healthcare provider how often you should test your blood sugar. That way, you can keep an eye on your levels and make changes when needed.

Stay Alert
STAY ALERT

It’s important to know the symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) so if it does happen, you’re ready to treat it. Remember, blood sugar below 70 mg/dL is too low. Below you’ll find a handy rule of thumb to treat low blood sugar, but make sure to treat low blood sugar like your healthcare provider told you.

15/15 Rule
15/15 RULE

If you have low blood sugar and can swallow:

  • Eat or drink something with 15 grams of carbs (like 1/2 cup of fruit juice)
  • Wait 15 minutes and test again
  • If your level is below 70 mg/dL, repeat these steps
  • If it’s still below 70 mg/dL after another 15 minutes, call your healthcare provider or 911 if needed
  • Once your blood sugar is back to normal, have a small snack if your next meal is more than 1 hour away
Low Blood Sugar Symptoms
SYMPTOMS

Low blood sugar symptoms can include:

  • Hunger
  • Irritability
  • Dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Sweating
  • Blurred Vision
  • Mood Change
  • Shaking
  • Confusion
  • Anxiety
  • Slurred Speech
  • Headache
  • Fast Heartbeat
  • Unconsciousness
Indications and Important Safety Information
Indication

BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes.

LIMITATION OF USE

BASAGLAR is not for treating diabetic ketoacidosis.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR.

Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed.

Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger.

Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection.

BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Trouble breathing
  • A fast heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with BASAGLAR. Your treatment with TZDs and BASAGLAR may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet
  • Sudden weight gain

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

While using BASAGLAR, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how BASAGLAR affects you. Do not drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, low potassium, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions. These are not all the possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

The BASAGLAR KwikPen® is a disposable, prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instructions for Use that accompanies the pen. BASAGLAR is available by prescription only.

BV DTC ISI 24JUN2016

References
1. Basaglar [Prescribing Information]. Indianapolis, IN: Eli Lilly & Co. 2. Linnebjerg H, Lam EC, Seger ME, et al. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LY2963016 insulin glargine and European Union- and U.S.- approved versions of Lantus insulin glargine in healthy subjects: three randomized euglycemic clamp studies. Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug 15. doi: 10.2337/dc14-2623.